Updated May 5, 2021

Get the COVID-19 Vaccine

Saint Luke's is now offering vaccination to individuals age 16 or older. You do not have to be a Saint Luke’s patient, or a resident of Kansas or Missouri, to receive a vaccine. To cut down on your wait time, we encourage you to schedule an appointment but walk-ins are accepted.

To schedule an appointment:

  • Patients: Log in to mySaintLuke’s and click on Visits > Schedule an Appointment. If you don’t have a mySaintLuke’s account, create an account now.
  • If you have never been a Saint Luke’s patient, select a clinic location below and choose an appointment slot.
  • Walk-in options: See hours under clinic location listings below
Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City, Medical Plaza

Saint Luke's Hospital of Kansas City
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
4320 Wornall Rd.
Kansas City, MO 64111

Select a convenient time for your COVID-19 Vaccine appointment below.

Directions: The vaccine clinic is located on the Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City campus in the Medical Plaza 1 building. You will drive to Entrance 3, located off Broadway just south of 43rd St., and park in the parking garage. Enter the Medical Plaza 1 building, take the elevator to the seventh floor, and follow signs to the vaccine clinic located in suite 728. The bus stop is on the 401 and 47 bus lines, at 43rd St. and Mill Creek Parkway. Head west along 43rd St., then turn left at Broadway and walk to Entrance 3.

Saint Luke’s Multispecialty Clinic–Blue Springs

Saint Luke’s Multispecialty Clinic–Blue Springs
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
600 NE Adams Dairy Pkwy
Blue Springs, MO 64014

Select a convenient time for your COVID-19 Vaccine appointment below.

Directions: The vaccine clinic is located inside the Saint Luke’s Multispecialty Clinic–Blue Springs building, located off I-70 and NE Adams Dairy Parkway. Enter through the main entrance and check in at the front desk. Please do not enter through the COVID-19 Testing entrance.

Saint Luke’s Primary Care–Parkville

Saint Luke's Primary Care-Parkville
Tuesday, Thursday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
6185 Jefferson Ave
Parkville, MO 64152

Select a convenient time for your COVID-19 Vaccine appointment below.

Directions: The vaccine clinic is located inside the Saint Luke’s Primary Care¬–Parkville building, located on MO-9, just south of MO-45, near Parkville City Hall. Enter through the main entrance and follow signage to the vaccine clinic. Patients have reported issues with GPS or app navigation directions to this location. Please verify your directions are directing you to our location on MO-9. If not, search "Parkville City Hall" and follow those directions.

Saint Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute (Overland Park)

Saint Luke's Rehabilitation Institute
Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
12300 Metcalf Ave
Overland Park, KS 66213

Select a convenient time for your COVID-19 Vaccine appointment below.

Directions: The vaccine clinic is located on the east side of the Saint Luke’s South Hospital campus in the Saint Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute. Enter from southbound Metcalf Ave. and turn left at the fork. Drive to Parking Lot I and follow signage to the clinic door. The bus stop is on the bus 401 line.

 


Important to know

  • Saint Luke’s is offering vaccination to any individuals age 16 or older. You do not have to be a Saint Luke’s patient, or a resident of Kansas or Missouri, to receive a vaccine.
  • To cut down on wait times, we encourage you to schedule an appointment, but walk-ins are accepted.
  • We continue outreach to Saint Luke's patients who do not have internet or computer access, as part of our commitment to vaccinating our community.
  • Before, and even after, your vaccination, continue wearing your mask, staying home when you can, social distancing, and washing your hands. These are still incredibly important steps.

View our vaccine FAQs to learn more about vaccine safety and possible side effects.

Vaccine FAQs

Basics

Who are other vaccination providers?

In addition to Saint Luke’s, there are several other organizations that offer COVID-19 vaccines. Follow information specific to your county for vaccine events, or check out local pharmacies and retailers offering the vaccine.

There are several COVID-19 vaccines approved for use. Which ones are being administered at Saint Luke’s?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved emergency use authorization for three COVID-19 vaccines. The vaccine developed by Pfizer-BioNTech is approved for people age 16 and older and the vaccines developed by Moderna and by Johnson & Johnson are approved for people age 18 and older. Vaccine availability is dependent on state allocations/supplies and patients will be offered whatever vaccine is available.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

How is the Johnson & Johnson vaccine different from the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines?

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine uses a different delivery method to create an immune response, though the end result is identical. Instead of using messenger RNA (mRNA), it attaches the COVID-19 spike protein DNA to an inactive adenovirus (a virus that typically causes colds but has been made inactive) to build immunity to COVID-19. You only need to get one dose instead of two.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

Is there a preferred COVID vaccine?

No. All available COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective. You should get whichever vaccine is available to you.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

Does it matter whether I receive different Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines for dose 1 and 2?

The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are not interchangeable, so you should receive the same vaccine for both doses, unless there are extreme circumstances. The CDC has recommended that patients who have a severe reaction to their first dose of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) can get their second booster dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine at least 28 days later.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

Should vaccination be delayed if a patient has any symptoms or is acutely ill?

If someone has an serious illness, it would be best to defer vaccination until they are recovered.

Will I have to pay to receive the COVID-19 vaccine?

Vaccine doses are being provided by the federal government at no cost to you. However, you may be charged an administration fee that will be billed to your insurance. If you do not have insurance there are resources available to cover the cost of the administration fee.

What can I do to stay safe prior to getting a vaccine?

Keep wearing your mask, stay home when you can, social distance, and wash your hands. All these things are making a difference in your health and the health of those around you.

Do I need to get the second dose of the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine?

Yes. The Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are most effective (94-95%) when both doses are administered; this ensures you have the best protection.

Safety and side effects

What kind of vaccines are the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines?

These vaccines are messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines. mRNA vaccines carry genetic instructions that allow the body to develop proteins. These proteins cause your body to develop immunity, which prevents COVID-19 infection if exposure occurs. mRNA vaccines DO NOT alter a person’s DNA or genetics. Learn more about this specific type of vaccine.

What kind of vaccine is the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine?

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is an adenoviral vector vaccine meaning it uses non-infectious virus to carry a genetic message to cells in the body causing the cells to create spike proteins. These proteins cause your body to develop an immune response, which prevents COVID-19 infection if exposure occurs. Learn more about this specific type of vaccine.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

Why was the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine paused?

The FDA and CDC announced a pause in offering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine out of abundance of caution after discovering six cases of patients who developed blood clots. The six cases were all women in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 48, with symptoms occurring between 6-13 days after vaccination. Nearly 7 million people in the United States have received Johnson & Johnson shots so far, and six individuals have developed this rare disorder. See more information from the CDC.

In April, the FDA and CDC announced a pause in the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. See more information from the CDC.

What should I do if I received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine?

While the likelihood of developing a blood clot following the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is very rare, if you have received the vaccine within the past three weeks and are experiencing symptoms of severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath, contact your health care provider or seek medical attention right away.

How do the vaccine types differ?

The vaccines available for COVID-19 all produce the same result—production of antibodies targeting COVID-19. Messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna) carry genetic instructions that allow the body to develop spike proteins. Adenoviral vector vaccines (Johnson & Johnson) use non-infectious virus to carry a genetic message to cells in the body, causing the cells to create spike proteins. For both vaccine types, creation of these proteins causes your body to develop immunity, which prevents COVID-19 infections if exposure occurs. Neither the adenoviral vector nor the genetic message causes an infection, as the vectors can’t replicate in humans and the genetic message only tells the body to develop a protein.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

Do the COVID-19 vaccines have any side effects?

Most reactions were mild to moderate. Incidents of serious adverse reactions were very low. Most common side effects include injection site soreness, muscle ache, headache, fever, and fatigue.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

How long does the vaccine provide protection?

Since the vaccines have been studied for less than a year, it’s unclear exactly how long the vaccines provide protection. However, early data show promise of at least shorter term (less than a year) of protection. Vaccine manufacturers will continue to monitor the duration of protection.

Can the vaccine give me COVID?

No. The COVID-19 vaccines does not contain live virus so you cannot get COVID from taking it. However, vaccines help your body develop the ability to fight off infection through a process called ‘reactogenicity,’ so you may experience symptoms including pain at the injection site, muscle aches, headache, fatigue, chills, and fevers. These symptoms may be more pronounced after the second dose. This simply means the vaccine is working. Additionally, the COVID-19 vaccine will not cause a positive test result with a PCR nasal test.

If I’ve already had COVID, or suspect I have, should I still get the vaccine?

Yes. Studies show that some patients who have tested positive for COVID-19 have undetectable antibodies, which means re-infection could occur.

However, the CDC has suggested that for those with known COVID infection, vaccination be deferred until after symptoms have resolved and isolation is no longer needed. Because risk of re-infection is unlikely in the months after infection, vaccination can be delayed until the end of this period, if desired. At this time, it’s also unclear whether passive immunotherapy (monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma) can alter development of immunity and it’s advised to wait at least 90 days before being vaccinated.

Does the vaccine prevent asymptomatic spread of COVID-19?

Available studies suggest that vaccination helps decrease asymptomatic spread. However, since it doesn’t appear to eliminate the risk, infection prevention measures must continue even after vaccination. These include masking, social distancing, and handwashing until herd immunity is achieved via mass vaccination.

If I’m pregnant, considering becoming pregnant, or breastfeeding, can I take the vaccine?

Pregnant patients were excluded from the COVID-19 vaccine studies, and it is unknown if the vaccine is excreted in breast milk. Talk with your Saint Luke’s obstetrician or your breastfed child’s physician about the risks and benefits of COVID-19 vaccination.

If I have a history of allergic reactions, can I take the vaccine?

CDC advises caution for individuals who have a history of severe allergic reaction (e.g. anaphylaxis) to an injectable medication or to another vaccine (not including Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine). There is a rare chance these vaccines could cause a severe allergic reaction, which would usually occur within a few minutes to one hour after receiving a dose of the vaccine.

Contraindication: Individuals who have a history of severe allergic reaction to the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine or any component of these vaccines should not receive vaccination.

Appropriate medical treatment used to manage immediate allergic reactions must be immediately available in case an anaphylactic reaction occurs following administration of the vaccine.

If I’m immunocompromised or on therapy that suppresses my immune system, should I get the vaccine?

Immunocompromised patients were not included in the vaccine studies; however, since the COVID-19 vaccines are inactive vaccines, they do not pose an immediate risk to immunocompromised patients. There is a risk of decreased immune response for those on therapy that suppresses the immune system.

Are the vaccines safe?

Yes. When the vaccine becomes available to you, we strongly encourage you to get it.

Given the speed of development of these vaccines, it’s understandable people have questions about whether there’s been enough research and testing to ensure the vaccines are safe. But all vaccines must go through rigorous clinical trials to determine safety and efficacy, with at least two months of patient follow-up. Vaccine manufacturers must report their findings to the FDA.

As with many vaccines, you may be sore at the injection site. You may also develop fatigue, fever, and muscle aches afterward. This seems to be more common with the second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. If this happens, it means your immune system is taking notice of the vaccine and reacting.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

Why should I get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Vaccination is the best way to slow this deadly pandemic. We understand that you might be uneasy about getting your COVID-19 vaccine. Here’s why you should consider getting your vaccine:

  • To protect yourself: Getting the vaccine means there’s up to a 95% chance that you’ll personally be protected from getting COVID-19.
  • To protect those around you: If you get sick, you could spread the virus to others. Getting the vaccine, while continuing to wear a mask and practice social distancing, will help keep your friends and family safe, especially those who may be at risk for a severe case of COVID-19.
  • To protect your community: For the vaccine to be effective against COVID-19, we need enough people — 50% to 80% — to get vaccinated. So, even though you may have to wear a mask for a little longer, we know that every person that gets vaccinated is a small step in the right direction.
Is it OK to get other vaccines at the same time as the COVID-19 vaccine?

If you’re getting another vaccine, such as one for shingles or flu, we recommend scheduling your vaccination a minimum of 14 days before or after you get the COVID-19 vaccine.

How old do you have to be to get the vaccine?

The FDA has authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for people age 16 and older and the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines for people age 18 and older.

Saint Luke’s recommends all COVID-19 vaccines that have received Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA, including Johnson & Johnson. The use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was paused to assess a rare, but serious, adverse event called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS). The safety review of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine suggests an extremely low risk of TTS. As of late April 2021, out of more than eight million Johnson & Johnson doses given in the U.S., only 15 cases of TTS have been reported. Reported cases have typically occurred in women 50 years and younger within three weeks of vaccination. After review, the CDC and FDA recommended resuming the use of Johnson & Johnson, as benefits of vaccination outweigh potential risks. 

The pause to assess the TTS risk demonstrates that patient safety is being taken seriously. Other vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna have not shown similar TTS concerns. Women 50 years and younger, should contact their provider if they have questions. See more information from the CDC.

Is the vaccine safe for children?

International studies are underway to determine if the vaccines are safe for children. The research is expected to take several months. Until the vaccine is approved for children, we will not be immunizing them. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approved for ages 16 and older, and those teens will be able to get the Pfizer vaccine when that age group is prioritized by the CDC for immunization.

We encourage parents to use safe practices such as handwashing, masking and social distancing to keep their families safe. We also recommend all adults in a household with children get vaccinated when they are eligible to do so.

Will I still need to wear a mask and socially distance after getting vaccinated?

Yes. Wearing masks, social distancing, and washing your hands will continue to be important even after you’re vaccinated. It’ll take time to immunize enough of the population to stop the virus from spreading, so we’ll need to continue these safe practices for some time.

Does the vaccine mean that other safety measures and restrictions can be relaxed?

Vaccines are one important piece of the puzzle in combating this pandemic and will eventually help life return to normal. It will take months before a large portion of the population is able to be vaccinated.

In the meantime, reducing the cases of COVID-19 needs to continue to be our priority. Efforts like wearing masks, social distancing, avoiding large gatherings, and practicing hand hygiene remain essential to reduce the spread.

While vaccination may reduce the ability to spread COVID-19, it doesn’t eliminate risk. So, please continue to follow state and national safety guidelines, even after you have been vaccinated.

Did the clinical trials include participants from different races and ethnicities?

More than 70,000 patients enrolled in mRNA clinical trials with 37% of the clinical trial volunteers coming from racial and ethnic minority populations. Nearly 44,000 patients enrolled in the Johnson & Johnson vaccine trial with 38% of volunteers comprising minority populations. Recognizing the disproportionate impact of the epidemic on underrepresented racial and ethnic communities, investigators worked with community engagement partners to enroll a diverse of pool of participants.


County-by-county information

Find your county health department for information specific to your area, including how to join your county’s vaccine list.

Local pharmacies and retailers

A number of businesses have joined the front to distribute the vaccine to local residents. Locate a business near you with available resources and follow their instructions to get started.

Learn more: Moderna Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers

Learn more: Pfizer-BioNTech Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers

Learn more: Johnson & Johnson (aka Janssen) Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers

News

Health News You Can Use: COVID-19 Vaccines
We discuss the science behind the COVID-19 vaccines, and address some concerns and misinformation about the vaccines.
KSHB: Infectious disease physician explains importance of getting COVID-19 booster shot

This week, hospitals in the Kansas City metro are starting to administer the COVID-19 booster shot to health care workers.

FOX4: Vaccinating KC: Your questions answered
As the initial doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine arrive in Kansas and Missouri, many people have questions about the new shots. FOX4 talked to Dr. Andrew Schlachter to get answers.
KSHB: Saint Luke's nurse details her COVID-19 vaccine journey
Front line workers at Saint Luke's have started getting the COVID-19 vaccine booster shot. KSHB talked to ICU nurse Kristin Sollars and Dr. Sarah Boyd about what to expect with the second dose.