Pharmacy Times: Dapagliflozin Improves Symptom Burden, Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Heart Failure

November 21, 2022

Treatment with dapagliflozin (Farxiga; AstraZeneca) was found to improve symptom burden and health-related quality of life in patients with heart failure (HF) with mildly reduced or preserved ejection fraction (EF) compared with placebo, according to findings from the DELIVER phase 3 trial presented at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2022 and are published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

“Many patients living with heart failure value their symptoms and physical function at least equally with avoidance of death, making these results highly clinically relevant. Given the fact that individuals with heart failure and mildly reduced and preserved ejection fraction experience especially poor health status, the findings should prompt clinicians to strongly consider initiation of SGLT2 inhibitors in this group, particularly if patients are symptomatic,” said Mikhail Kosiborod, MD, cardiologist at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, vice president of Research at Saint Luke’s Health System, professor of Medicine at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, in a press release.

Read the full Pharmacy Times article: Dapagliflozin Improves Symptom Burden, Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Heart Failure

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