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FOX4: On mission to discover more on ancient Egyptian history, Saint Luke's doctor performs scan of a queen

October 22, 2019

One of the most studied time periods in human history is that of ancient Egypt, and the remains of a queen from that time period are in Kansas City. Queen Nefertari was the Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Ramses II's wife.

The remains that were examined are in town from the renowned Museo Egizio in Turin, Italy. Dr. Randall Thompson, a cardiologist at Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, has previous experience working with mummies and was asked to scan the 3,000 year old Queen's remains to take a look back in time to see if there is any arterial disease in her leg. 

Beginning on November 15, 2019, the Nelson-Atkins Museum will host the international exhibit, Queen Nefertari: Eternal Egypt.” The exhibition will be in town through March.


The Queen's remains are on loan from the renowned Museo Egizio in Turin, Italy. Marco Rossani, Muse Eqizio Collections Director, helped get the Queen Nefertari ready for the CT scan.


Kathleen Leighton, with the Nelson Atkins Museum, spoke to Marcus about the exhibition coming up and what visitors will be able to expect when they go. 

 

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