Foster Home Types

There are a number of types of foster homes that differ based on the parent’s backgrounds and abilities, and the child’s needs. Learn more about each one to determine which is best suited for you.  

Traditional foster home

A family that can provide care and structure to a youth from birth to teen while promoting safe and healthy childhood experiences. 

  • Can work outside of the home as daycare is provided
  • Can have no more than five children total in the home, including biological children
  • Children are in traditional school settings with no extraordinary needs
  • Children typically have minimal or no medication management needs
  • Children will have weekly visitation with biological parent which should be supported by the foster parent

Medical foster home

A family that is committed to providing care for a youth, birth to teen, with a diagnosed extraordinary medical condition that requires 24-hour care. This could include children with acute medical issues or sever developmental delays. 

  • Medical background or experience with medical needs children is preferred but not required
  • Additional medical instruction/training is provided based upon the child’s needs
  • Can have no more than two medical children and no more than five children total in the home, including biological children

Elevated needs foster home

A family that can provide intensive, individualized interventions that allow a child to be successful in a home-based setting. Youth are in need of greater structure, supervision, and are less able to assume responsibility for daily care.

  • Behavioral training - 18 hours (which will include understanding child trauma and managing challenging behavior)
  • Intensive behavioral training - 9 hours (including crisis management, behavior management and medication management) 
  • Typically, youth are age five or older and have more significant behavioral and mental health needs
  • Responsible for arranging and transporting to all medical appointments, therapy and community activities
  • Minimum of one year of experience as a traditional foster parent
  • Can work outside of the home but the primary caretaker should have a flexible job as these youth often have more appointments
  • Provide 24-hour supervision and responsiveness to child’s needs
  • Can have no more than two above-level children in the home with a maximum of five children total-including biological children 
  • Children will have weekly visitation with biological parent which should be supported by the foster parent

Therapeutic foster home

A family that can provide focused, intensive care for a youth with significant mental health needs. The family will be committed to providing care for only one or two children at a time as these youths require constant supervision. 

  • Twenty-seven additional hours of elevated needs training
  • Ten hours of treatment foster care training
  • One parent ideally would work from home or not work to devote additional time to specific child’s needs (IEP meetings. Monthly medication management, weekly therapy, etc.)
  • Understanding of trauma and how it impacts a child’s development and growth
  • Youth are typically age 10 or older with significant mental health issues that require consistency and stability
  • Children will have weekly visitation with biological parent which should be supported by the foster parent

Learn more

Crittenton Children’s Center is actively seeking individuals and families that may be interested in becoming foster or foster-to-adopt parents.

Learn more about our Foster Care and Foster-to-Adopt services.