NPR: Rural Areas Send Their Sickest Patients To The Cities, Straining Hospital Capacity

November 29, 2020

In the last few months, rural counties in both Kansas and Missouri have seen some of the highest rates of COVID-19 in the country.

Critically ill rural patients are often sent to city hospitals for high-level treatment, and as their numbers grow, urban hospitals are under added strain.

Dr. Marc Larsen, an emergency care physician and Director of Operations for Saint Luke's COVID-19 Response Team, explains how this trend is impacting many Kansas City hospitals.

Read the full NPR story: Rural Areas Send Their Sickest Patients To The Cities, Straining Hospital Capacity

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